It’s been a long, exhausting day. So why are you still lying in bed awake, staring at the clock, losing precious hours of sleep?

Almost a third of Americans have trouble falling asleep. One major cause is stress. Humans are always stressed, whether they’re dealing with a global pandemic or a high-pressure job. We can’t control it. What we can do is make it easier for ourselves to enjoy a deep and restful sleep and to attain a restful mindset.

Start planning early.

A good night’s sleep begins during the day.

You can start by targeting caffeinated beverages. Although caffeine provides a nice boost in the morning, it can take 8 to 14 hours for it to work its way out of your system. A cup of coffee in the afternoon may be responsible for your wakefulness at two in the morning. So don’t drink coffee, soda, or tea after 10 a.m. If you’re especially sensitive to caffeine, limit your chocolate consumption, too.

A good workout also helps. A 2013 survey found that “vigorous, moderate and light exercisers are significantly more likely to say ‘I had a good night’s sleep’ every night or almost every night on work nights than non-exercisers.”

Nix the nightcap.

What could be more relaxing than winding down with a cocktail or glass of wine before bed?

Waking up fully rested, for one thing. Although it may seem to help you fall asleep faster, in fact alcohol impairs the quality of your sleep. It reduces REM sleep, resulting in a lighter and less restful slumber. And as your body metabolizes alcohol, its sleep-inducing properties wear off, and you wake up with a dry throat. If and when you fall asleep again, you may suffer from nightmares as your body struggles to catch up with its REM cycles.

All this adds up to a poor night’s sleep.

You can still enjoy a glass of wine with your dinner. But limit your consumption—to no more than one drink for women, two for men. And make sure to stop imbibing three hours before you go to bed so that your body has time to process the alcohol.

Skip the screen time.

Although it’s tempting to fall asleep while watching Netflix, the artificial blue light emitted from your laptop or television screen is anything but calming; it interferes with your body’s melatonin production and internal clock. This means that even if your body needs rest, you might not feel sleepy while binge-watching your favorite show. So switch the display to night-time mode when the sun goes down and turn off your devices an hour or so before bedtime to give yourself a chance to relax. Then unwind with a book, a bath, music, meditation, or other soothing bedtime rituals.

Try CBD.

If your mind starts racing the minute your head hits the pillow, CBD may be just what you need.

A 2019 study showed that CBD had a calming effect in participants, with more than 66% reporting better sleep. Moreover, high oral doses of CBD — i.e., 150 to 600 milligrams a day — may provide relief if you have a hard time falling asleep or staying asleep. Our High-Potency CBD Drops are the strongest CBD oils on the market. And our third-party testing and quality control processes ensure that you’re getting a safe, effective dose. We recommend taking one milliliter (one full dropper) sublingually an hour before bedtime. Or for an even more concentrated dose of CBD, you may want to try taking CBD isolate powder, the purest and most versatile form of CBD available.

Set the stage for sleep.

The quality of your sleep is also affected by your environment. A comfortable mattress that is not more than eight or ten years old, blackout curtains, weighted blankets, and temperatures of around 65 degrees are all conducive to sound sleep.

Contact us if you have questions about any of our CBD products or need some guidance in selecting the best form and method of intake. If your sleep problems persist, you have a serious medical condition, or you are taking any medication, please consult with a doctor to determine the best CBD regimen for your needs.

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